Cooking For Health

Functional Formularies Offers Organic, Plant-Based Options for Tube-Feeding

By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

A small independent company based in Ohio launched a feeding tube formula called Liquid Hope, comprised entirely of organic whole foods like chickpeas, sprouted quinoa, almond butter, turmeric, kale, sweet potato, and other high-energy, anti-inflammatory ingredients. Unlike most conventional enteral nutrition formulas, Liquid Hope is free from sugar, corn syrup, omega-6 laden oils, and dairy ingredients. It is making a profound difference in the lives of many patients. 

FDA Revamps It's Field Guide to Food Additives

By Kristen Schepker, Assistant Editor

There are well over 10,000 chemical additives--flavorings, colorings, preservatives--that the federal government permits for use in food products sold in the US. While a few occasionally grab headlines--think monosodium glutamate, sodium nitrite, high-fructose corn syrup, aspartame--the vast majority garner very little public attention.

The Cult and Culture of Vegan Cheese

By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

We're witnessing a vegan cheese explosion these days. US sales of these plant-based, non-dairy cheeses jumped by 43% in 2018 , according to the Plant-Based Food Association, and are forecast to hit the $4 billion mark by 2024. Venture capital firms are all over it, and the market is thriving. These products have evolved a long way in the last decade. How healthy are they, and for whom? 

In "How to Change Your Mind," Michael Pollan Explores Resurgence of Psychedelic Medicine

By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

After decades on the margins of both polite society and medical research, psychotropic compounds such as psilocybin, LSD, MDMA, and the like, are once again the focus of serious clinical investigation as potential therapies for a host of psychological and neurological conditions. In his newest book, How to Change Your Mind, popular author explores the resurgence of psychedelic medicine without bias, agenda, or pretense.

Innovative Med Schools Put Future Doctors in the Kitchen

By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

The connection between food choices and wellness goes back at least as far as ancient Greece. Yet it’s taken two millennia for Western medical schools to make food part of medical training. Innovative medical schools around the country are beginning to introduce Culinary Medicine into their curricula.

Challenged by MS, the "Spice-Trekkers" Discover Their Own Culinary Medicine

By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

Philippe and  Ethné de Vienne an explorer by nature. He and his wife Ethné travel the world, sourcing organic spices and herbs where they’re grown. That’s their job as the owners of the Montreal-based spice company, Épices de Cru. But five years ago, when Philippe was suddenly diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, their search took a very different turn--one that led to important discoveries about how to use foods and spices to alter the course of serious autoimmune diseases.

With Sioux Chef, Native Americans Rediscover Indigenous Foodways

By Ana Maria Puente, Contributing Writer

With a restaurant and catering company called Sioux Chef, an Oglala Lakota chef named Sean Sherman is helping Native American communities--and many other non-Natives--to discover the original indigenous foods of North America. Many native foods--things like cattail shoots, prairie turnips, choke cherries, prickly pears, rabbit and bison--are extremely healthy.

Wholesome Rx: Prescribe Produce, Not Pills

By By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

“Eat more fresh produce.” It’s an easy bit of medical advice to give. Yet it’s advice millions of Americans aren’t able to follow, even if they want to. A non-profit group called Wholesome Wave is working to make it a little bit easier for both practitioners and patients, by creating a system that allows doctors to literally prescribe produce for patients and their families in underserved communities.

A Taste of African Heritage Offers Culinary Path to Wellness

By Ellen Kanner, Contributing Writer

Sweet potatoes, peanuts, black-eyed peas, lima beans, collard and mustard greens, sorghum, millet.... these and so many other healthy foods originated in Africa and the African diaspora. Reconnecting with these foods offers the opportunity to make Black History Month a celebration of wellness as well as a celebration of culture.