Cancer Care

"I Expect My Patients to Be Outliers": Applying Nutrition to Improve Cancer Outcomes

By Erik Goldman, Editor

“I expect my patients to be outliers, to defy the statistics, to defy the odds,” says Nalini Chilkov, LAc, OMD, a practitioner of oriental medicine and nutrition counseling, who specializes in working with cancer patients.

Over a career spanning more than 30 years, Dr. Chilkov has treated thousands of people with diverse forms of cancer. She’s witnessed first-hand the positive impact that thoughtful, carefully-tailored diets and supplementation protocols can have. She shares a wealth of clinical pearls on how to use nutritional interventions to improve health outcomes for people with cancer.

What Common Blood Tests Reveal About Cancer Risk

By Nalini Chilkov, LAc, OMD, Contributing Writer

While there is no simple blood test for predicting who will get cancer, there is a lot of information to be gleaned from basic blood work that, taken together, reveals much about an individual’s predispositions for many forms of cancer.

Vitamin D Reduces Fatigue in Cancer Patients

By John Otrompke, Contributing Writer - Vol. 13, No. 4. Winter, 2012

A new study shows that Vitamin D supplementation, at a dose of 2,000 IU per day, reduced the symptoms of fatigue in a cohort of people with various types of cancer.

Massive Study Finds Link Between Allergies & Hematologic Cancers

By John Otrompke, Contributing Writer - Vol. 13, No. 3. 2012,
A cohort study of over 64,000 people found that those with allergies to grass, plants and trees were more likely to develop hematologic malignancies compared with people who don't have allergies. The surprising observation runs contrary to studies, and has investigators and clinicians scratching their heads.

Ginseng and Curcumin: Herbal Allies in Cancer Care

By John Otrompke, Contributing Writer
Ginseng and curcumin, two herbs with long histories of use in traditional Asian herbal medicine, have beneficial effects in people with cancer, according to new studies presented at this year's annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).